Ancient Civilizations of the Inner Sea: Meet the Carthaginians

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Below is the first in a series of articles from Mark McLaughlin showcasing the ten civilizations in Ancient Civilizations of the Inner Sea. Enjoy!


Carthage began as a modest outpost and stopping point for Phoenician traders, but even before Greece entered its Golden Age, this city on the southern coast of the Mediterranean was famed for its wealth and power.  In Ancient Civilizations of the Inner Sea, Carthage finds it strength and draws its durability from its military advantages – White Tiles that are added during the Competition Phase.  Carthage has a combination of that initial naval superiority it had in the First Punic War, the brilliant generalship of Hannibal that nearly won it victory in the Second Punic War, and the massive defensive walls that let it hold out so long in the Third Punic War, the one after which, sadly for its people, the Romans were finally able to boast “Carthago Delenda Est.”

In a full map game, Carthage has a central position immediately across from Rome, yet also must concern itself with its African neighbors, most notably Mauretania. In games played out on just the western half of the map especially it is easy to see how and where it came into conflict with Rome. That rivalry is more fully fleshed out in the Punic Wars set-up and, even more so, in the “Hannibal” Historical Wargame Scenario, either of which, like all set-ups and scenarios, can be played Solitaire.   Carthage can use its military advantages for conquest – or to warn foes away.  Knowing that Carthage can always add a Tile to defense of its Home Area, and to one other Land and one Sea Competion as well can deter aggression by its neighbors – or at least give its Roman foes pause.


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